Eugenie Jones with Time3Jazz

Friday, July 7, 2017 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
This event does not repeat

Eugenie Jones is described as a performer that makes audiences feel jazz. Vocally described as possessing, “A voice that covers words like pieces of silk covering precious stones,” Jones is an emotive, engaging song stylist that entertains, dazzles and decisively wins over audiences. (Charles Mudede) 

Reminiscent in style and sophistication of iconic vocalists of the past, Jones sings and scats her way vivaciously through mainstream jazz, but also draws listeners inside contemporary storylines, sharing original tunes that have earned her recognition as a cleverly gifted lyricist. 

Born and raised in West Virginia to parents who loved gospel, jazz and soul, with older siblings who were into the Motown sound, and having a mother who sang lead in the church choir, exposed Jones to a variety of musical foundations before making her professional debut as a singer/songwriter in Seattle, WA. 

With an MBA and a career in marketing, however, it wasn’t until she lost her mother to cancer that she felt drawn into the world of music.

“I can only describe my beginnings in jazz as a time of missing my mom, missing hearing her voice singing around the house and wondering within myself if I could do that – if I could sing and carry on that part of her?” With her original “A Good Day” downloaded on All About Jazz more than 9,000 times, critics and fans have answered Jones query with a resounding, YES! 

As a national recording artist, Jones has self-produced two primarily original vocal jazz projects earning her ranking on Jazz Week Review Top-50 , #1 spots on CMJ charts, favorable reviews from Down Beat, Jazziz, All About Jazz, and numerous other industry mediums. 
“In that overcrowded arena known as “female jazz singers”, Seattle-based Eugenie Jones manages to stand apart from the crowd. Ms. Jones has filled both of her outstanding albums with her own engaging compositions. This fact alone differentiates her as she is one of the very few African-American women singer-songwriters in jazz today. And finally, the lady can sing as well as she can write. She is an intelligent, thoughtful composer in the tradition of Abbey Lincoln and Nina Simone. Fans of true jazz singing, it’s time for you to sit up and take notice.” (C. Davenport/Curt’s Jazz).

At RockFish Grill or Anacortes Brewery. Time not listed, we picked 6pm.